News Home » Top Stories » Judge approves restraining order against Minneapolis police

Around the World

Judge approves restraining order against Minneapolis police

Former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane.
Former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane. Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office 

A lawyer representing one of the former police officers charged in George Floyd’s death, claims that Floyd was resisting arrest and that his client suggested rolling Floyd over while officer Derek Chauvin was kneeling on his neck.  

Earl Gray, attorney for former officer Thomas Lane, described the body camera footage from the scene, which has not been made public. 

Gray said that if the public saw the full body camera footage from Lane, "I believe they would have a different opinion."

"It wasn't a violent resistance, but it was not a kind of nonresistance that an individual should do when a police officer is arresting him," Gray said of Floyd. 

Lane, 37, had only been on the force for four days when he helped to restrain Floyd, according to his lawyer.

"My client is holding his legs, Mr. Floyd is saying he can't breathe and my client says to the 20-year veteran Chauvin should we roll him over," Gray said. "Lane asked, should we roll him on his side and officer Chauvin said no," Gray said. "Now, we've got a 20-year officer here and a four-day officer in my client."

"Then later, my client again says, do you want to roll him on his side? This is right before the ambulance comes and again he's not rolled on his side."

Gray said that Lane "did not want to see the man die" and started to perform CPR on Floyd. 

"My client is holding his feet. When the ambulance comes, my client goes in the ambulance. Four days on the force ... and starts his own CPR, pushing down on his chest, which he did for a lengthy period of time, until they got the machine on," according to Gray.

Officers Chauvin, Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao were responding to a call about a $20 counterfeit bill on May 25 when they detained Floyd

Chauvin -- who pressed his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes -- was charged last Wednesday with a new, more serious count of second-degree murder. 

Kueng, Thao and Lane were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.