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Live updates: George Floyd protests across the US

Demonstrators march across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York on Thursday, June 4. 
Demonstrators march across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York on Thursday, June 4.  Andrew Kelly/Reuters

In a little over a week, Americans have gone from taking their first hesitant steps outside again to marching in tightly-packed crowds in cities all over the country.

But despite the sudden shift, the truth is coronavirus isn't over.

So far this week, 4,430 people have been reported dead, an average of 886 a day. Of the total number of deaths this week, 1,036 were reported in the past 24 hours.

And officials fear those numbers will rise significantly with the nationwide George Floyd protests.

All week, protesters have chanted slogans and shouted Floyd's name, some without masks. During arrests, police have loaded them into vehicles and holding cells -- without social distancing.

"Based on the way the disease spreads, there is every reason to expect that we will see new clusters and potentially new outbreaks moving forward," US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams warned this week.

Read the full story:

Over 1,000 coronavirus deaths reported in the past 24 hours. Officials fear protests will bring new outbreaks
Demonstrators protest near the White House on June 4 in Washington.
Demonstrators protest near the White House on June 4 in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP

It has now been more than 10 days since George Floyd died in Minneapolis, Minnesota, under the weight of a police officer's knee on his neck.

Since then, protests have taken place across the nation, from major cities to small rural towns.

Last weekend and the first few days of this week were marked by growing unrest, with many protests ending in violent clashes. In some cities, protesters threw projectiles and shone lasers, while police fired tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets.

Police officers stand in formation after curfew on Thursday night in New York.
Police officers stand in formation after curfew on Thursday night in New York. John Minchillo/AP

The violence, and widespread looting in cities like New York, prompted authorities to enact curfews in many cities, including Washington, DC, and Los Angeles.

Still, for many nights, protesters ignored the curfew and stayed on the streets. In some places, police allowed them to keep demonstrating past curfew if things stayed peaceful. In other places, officers enforced the curfew by arresting protesters, sometimes with force.

Protesters march in the streets of San Diego, California, on June 4.
Protesters march in the streets of San Diego, California, on June 4. Gregory Bull/AP

As the week comes to an end, the raw anger appears to be ebbing, with fewer violent confrontations, reports of looting, and arrests. Protests on Wednesday and Thursday were largely peaceful, save for a few outlying incidents.

There was also a sense of grief and mourning that set in on Thursday, when the first of several memorial services took place in Minneapolis.

Floyd's family was joined by dozens of guests, including civil rights leaders Rev. Jesse Jackson, Rev. Al Sharpton, Democratic Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar, Martin Luther King III and comedian Kevin Hart.

Philonise Floyd speaks at the memorial service for his brother George on June 4. He said George had "touched many hearts" and that the audience in Minneapolis was a testament of that. "Everybody wants justice, we want justice for George," Philonise said. "He's going to get it."
Philonise Floyd speaks at the memorial service for his brother George on June 4. He said George had "touched many hearts" and that the audience in Minneapolis was a testament of that. "Everybody wants justice, we want justice for George," Philonise said. "He's going to get it." Julio Cortez/AP

It's not just the US either -- thousands of people are protesting in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement around the world, from Sydney to London to Paris. And in some cases, it's shining a spotlight on issues of racial equality in other countries.

See more in CNN's gallery:

Photos: George Floyd protests across America

George Floyd's brother joyfully shared memories of their childhood together in Houston -- from eating banana and mayonnaise sandwiches to playing football together -- during the first of several memorials planned in Floyd's honor.

But Philonise Floyd also said it was painful to be so close to his brother for the first time since his death.

"(The casket) wasn't open, but we knew he was there," Philonise Floyd told CNN's Don Lemon Thursday. "And just knowing he was there, it hurt."

Floyd's death has reignited conversations over racial bias and police brutality in the US.

Recalling video of Floyd's daughter, Gianna, on a friend's shoulders saying "Daddy changed the world," Colorado Gov. Jared Polis said in a news conference Thursday that he is seeing "a reawakening of our national conscious, one that was long overdue."

And Flint, Michigan, Sheriff Chris Swanson said that the message from Floyd's death has been a tipping point that will change policing in America forever.

"Get your rest, George," Rev. Al Sharpton said at the memorial. "You changed the world, George."

Read more:

George Floyd remembered at memorial for changing the world as bail is set for ex-officers charged in his death

Stacey Abrams, the former top Democrat in the Georgia House of Representatives, condemned US President Donald Trump's handling of the protests and urged people to take their anger and frustrations to the polls later this year.

Speaking to CNN on Thursday night, Abrams pointed to the clashes between police and protesters on Monday outside the White House, shortly before Trump walked to St. John's Church to take a photo with a Bible.

"The fact that the President of the United States is such a moral coward and such a physical coward, that he required the decimation of our civil liberties so he could cross the street to do performative art in front of a burned church -- that is a condemnation of who he is, but it should never be seen as an example of who we are," Abrams said.

She added that she hadn't joined the protests in Atlanta because she didn't want to distract from the efforts of young activists taking the lead. Instead, she has tried to support the movement by helping provide lawyers and bail funds.

On voting: Abrams urged people to turn anger into action come November when the presidential election arrives.

“Voting is like medicine," she said. "We have a nation that is diseased, it is diseased by racism and by systems of injustice that need to be cured but there is not a single medicine you can take that instantly cures your disease. It takes time and you've got to go through treatment, and voting is one of those treatments." 
Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao face charges in the death of George Floyd.
Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao face charges in the death of George Floyd. Hennepin County Sheriff's Office/AP

Four Minneapolis police officers were responding to a call about a $20 counterfeit bill on May 25 when they detained George Floyd, who died while in custody.

The four officers were fired and are now facing charges in Floyd's death.

Here's an abridged summary of what we know about them.

Derek Chauvin:

  • He pressed his knee into George Floyd's neck while Floyd was lying on the street.
  • He was charged with a new, more serious count of second-degree murder. He had previously been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.
  • He was with the Minneapolis Police Department for nearly 19 years, and was the subject of at least 18 prior complaints, only two of which were "closed with discipline."

J. Alexander Kueng:

  • He was charged Wednesday with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.
  • He helped restrain Floyd along with Chauvin and officer Thomas Lane.
  • He was hired as a police officer with the Minneapolis Police Department in December. He had no prior complaints. When Floyd's death took place, it was Kueng's third shift as a police officer, said his attorney.

Thomas Lane:

  • He was charged Wednesday with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.
  • He joined the police department as a cadet in February 2019. He didn't have a history of complaints. Lane had been on the police force for four days when Floyd died, according to his attorney.

Tou Thao:

  • He stood near the other officers as they restrained Floyd.
  • He was charged Wednesday with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.
  • Thao had been an officer with the Minneapolis Police Department since 2012.
  • He had six complaints filed with internal affairs, one of which was still open. The other five were closed without discipline.

Read the full profiles here.

Two military personnel were injured by a lightning strike shortly after midnight in the area around Washington's Lafayette Park, where protesters have been gathering nightly.

Both sustained non-life threatening injuries, DC Fire and EMS said in a tweet.

The curfew was lifted tonight in DC, with protests staying peaceful all day. Demonstrators stayed in the streets late into the night, many near the Lafayette Park perimeter.

Protesters take a knee in front of police officers on June 4 in the Brooklyn borough of New York.
Protesters take a knee in front of police officers on June 4 in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Frank Franklin II/AP

Nationwide protests against police brutality and racial injustice were largely peaceful on Thursday, with many cities lifting their curfews to reflect the calmer demonstrations. It's now just past 11:30 p.m. in Los Angeles, but in many major cities, small crowds remain on the streets.

Here's what you need to know:

  • In New York, police arrested several protesters in Manhattan's Midtown for marching past the 8 p.m. curfew. Further upstate in Buffalo, two police officers were suspended without pay after pushing a 75-year-old man to the ground during a protest. The man was hospitalized in a stable but serious condition, Buffalo's mayor said.
  • In LA and Washington, DC, curfews were lifted on Thursday after peaceful protests over the past few nights. Protesters still gathered to demonstrate, but there were no clashes.
  • A memorial service to honor George Floyd took place in Minneapolis. Floyd's family was joined by dozens of guests, including civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson, Democratic Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar, Martin Luther King III and comedian Kevin Hart.
  • March on Washington: At the service, Rev. Al Sharpton announced that he's organizing a March on Washington in late August to mark the 57th anniversary of the historic demonstration for civil rights.
  • More memorials to come: People in Raeford, North Carolina, and Houston, Texas, will be able to pay their respects to Floyd in the next five days, with public and private memorials planned.
  • Military leaders speak out: Gen. John Allen, the former commander of American forces in Afghanistan, joined former Defense Secretary James Mattis and a chorus of other former military leaders in condemning US President Donald Trump's handling of the protests.
  • Bail set at $1 million: A judge set bail for three former Minneapolis police officers charged in Floyd's death at $1 million each, or $750,000 under certain conditions. Bail for a fourth former officer was raised to $1 million Wednesday, court documents show.
  • Ahmaud Arbery: In a preliminary hearing, the investigator testified that Arbery -- a black man who was shot dead in Georgia in February -- was hit with a truck before he died, and his killer allegedly used a racial slur. The judge ruled all three defendants in that case would stand trial on all charges.
Rev. Al Sharpton speaks at a memorial service for George Floyd on June 4 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Rev. Al Sharpton speaks at a memorial service for George Floyd on June 4 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

The Rev. Al Sharpton announced Thursday that he's organizing a March on Washington in late August to mark the 57th anniversary of the historic demonstration for civil rights as protests over the death of George Floyd sweep the nation.

Sharpton said the event will be led by the families of black people who have died at the hands of police officers, including Floyd's family. Sharpton made the announcement while speaking at Floyd's memorial service on Thursday.

"On August 28, the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington, we're going back to Washington," Sharpton said as he delivered a eulogy for Floyd, a black man who was killed last week by a white police officer in Minneapolis, during the memorial service.

"We're going back this August 28 to restore and recommit that dream (of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.) ... We need to go back to Washington and stand up, black, white, Latino, Arab, in the shadows of Lincoln and tell them this is the time to stop this," Sharpton said.

Sharpton said the march is going to be led by the families that "know the pain" and know what it's like to be "neglected," including the families of Floyd and Eric Garner, a black man who was choked to death in 2014 by a police officer in New York.

Read more:

Al Sharpton announces new March on Washington led by families of black people killed by police

Lee Merritt, the attorney for Ahmaud Arbery's family, told CNN on Thursday that Arbery's killing was "an intentional act by men who were motivated by hate."

Arbery, a black man, was shot and killed while jogging in Brunswick, Georgia, on February 23. In a preliminary hearing today, the investigator testified that Arbery's killer had allegedly used a racial slur.

"You know, I understand how hard that was for (Arbery's mother) to get through, but what we learned from the testimony that went forward, that this was an intentional act by men who were motivated by hate," Merritt said.

"We heard the N-word used repeatedly, but every interaction they had with Ahmaud seemed to be based on a fear of his black skin. And we just heard it over and over and over again as they walked through the narrative, and it seemed like the defense was leaning into that as a defense, that Ahmaud was a menacing black man, even as he ran away," Merritt said.

Arbery's mother, Wanda Cooper, told CNN it was "heartbreaking" to hear about the slur.

"I often imagine the last minutes of my son’s life. I didn't imagine it would be that harsh, but to learn that that statement was made in the last seconds of his life -- again, it was very heartbreaking," she said.